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The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Quadrantids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the minor planet 2003 EH1. The radient will be located in the constellation Bo├Âtes. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is about 75 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.

Jupiter and Earth will be at their closest distance from one another due to their orbital positions. Jupiter will also be fully illuminated by the Sun making this the best time to observe it. Click here for more information on viewing Juptier.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


Mercury will be at maximum elongation. Mercury will be its furthest distance from the Sun as seen from Earth and this will be the best time to view it. It is best observed at dusk right after sunset. Click here for more information on viewing Mercury.

The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


Mercury will be at maximum elongation. Mercury will be its furthest distance from the Sun as seen from Earth and this will be the best time to view it. It is best observed right before sunrise in the eastern sky. Click here for more information on viewing Mercury.


Venus will be at maximum elongation. Venus will be its furthest distance from the Sun as seen from Earth and this will be the best time to view it. It is best observed right before sunrise in the eastern sky. Click here for more information on viewing Venus.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


Mars and Earth will be at their closest distance from one another due to their orbital positions. Mars will also be fully illuminated by the Sun making this the best time to observe it. The opposition of Mars creates one of the most dramtic improvements in visibility due to its orbit’s proximity to Earth’s, and is also the rarest planetary opposition due to the “quick” orbit of Mars, occuring only every 780 days. Click here for more information on viewing Mars.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The moon will cross into the Earth’s shadow creating a total lunar eclipse. The lunar eclipse will be visible from North and South America, as well as Australia and New Zealand.
Click here for more information on lunar eclipses.
Click here for NASA’s detailed report on this eclipse.


The Lyrids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the Comet Thatcher. The radient will be located in the constellation Lyra. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 15 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.

An annular solar eclipse will occur as the Moon will appear to cross over the Sun in the sky. The annular solar eclipse will be visible from Antarctica. The partial solar eclipse will be visible from Antarctica and Australia.

Click here for more information on solar eclipses.
Click here for NASA’s detailed report on this eclipse.


The Eta Aquarids Meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from Halley’s Comet. The radient will be located in the constellation Aquarius. The typical hourly rate of meteors is 20 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


Saturn and Earth will be at their closest distance from one another due to their orbital positions. Saturn will also be fully illuminated by the Sun making this the best time to observe it. Click here for more information on viewing Saturn.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


Mercury will be at maximum elongation. Mercury will be its furthest distance from the Sun as seen from Earth and this will be the best time to view it. It is best observed at dusk right after sunset. Click here for more information on viewing Mercury.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Arietids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the either the asteroid 1566 Icarus or the comet 96P/Macholz. The radient will be located between the constellations Aries and Perseus. These constellations will be somewhat close to the Sun at this time of year so the shower can be difficult to see. The best time to see this shower is in the very early hours of the day. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 60 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


Mercury will be at maximum elongation. Mercury will be its furthest distance from the Sun as seen from Earth and this will be the best time to view it. It is best observed right before sunrise in the eastern sky. Click here for more information on viewing Mercury.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Delta Aquarids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the Marsden and Kracht comets. The radient will be located in the constellation Aquarius. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 20 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


The Alpha Capricornids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the comet 169/NEAT. The radient will be located in the constellation Capricornus. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 5 per hour. While this is a some what slow meteor shower the meteors tend to be quite spectacular slow moving flaring meteors.Click here for more information on meteor showers.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Perseids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the Swift-Tuttle Comet. The radient will be located in the constellation Perseus. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 50 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


Neptune and Earth will be at their closest distance from one another due to their orbital positions. Neptune will also be fully illuminated by the Sun making this the best time to observe it. Click here for more information on viewing Neptune.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


Mercury will be at maximum elongation. Mercury will be its furthest distance from the Sun as seen from Earth and this will be the best time to view it. It is best observed at dusk right after sunset. Click here for more information on viewing Mercury.


Uranus and Earth will be at their closest distance from one another due to their orbital positions. Uranus will also be fully illuminated by the Sun making this the best time to observe it. Click here for more information on viewing Uranus.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The moon will cross into the Earth’s shadow creating a total lunar eclipse. The lunar eclipse will be visible from North and South America, eastern Asia, Australia and New Zealand.
Click here for more information on lunar eclipses.
Click here for NASA’s detailed report on this eclipse.


The Orionids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from Halley’s Comet. The radient will be located in the constellation Orion. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 25 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.

An partial solar eclipse will occur as the Moon will appear to cross over the Sun in the sky. The eclipse will be visible from North America

Click here for more information on solar eclipses.
Click here for NASA’s detailed report on this eclipse.

 
 


The Taurids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the comet Encke. The radient will be located in the constellation Taurus. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 15 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


Mercury will be at maximum elongation. Mercury will be its furthest distance from the Sun as seen from Earth and this will be the best time to view it. It is best observed right before sunrise in the eastern sky. Click here for more information on viewing Mercury.


The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Leonids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the comet Tempel-Tuttle. The radient will be located in the constellation Leo. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 15 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.

The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.

The Moon will be at its fullest as it will be positioned behind the Earth in relation to the Sun. While this is a decent time to view the moon itself, it will be present throughout the night, outshining large portions of the night sky. This will make for non-ideal viewing conditions for stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Geminids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the asteroid 3200 Phaethon. The radient will be located in the constellation Gemini. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 50 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.


The Moon will be positioned between the Earth and Sun will not be visible at night. Although observations of the Moon will be impossible it allows for the darkest night skies for viewing everything else! The week before and after the new moon are the best times to go stargazing. Click here for more information on the phases of the moon.


The Ursids meteor shower will be peaking. This meteor shower is the result of the Earth’s orbit passing through debris from the comet Tuttle. The radient will be located in the constellation Ursa Minor. The typical hourly rate of visible meteors is 20 per hour. Click here for more information on meteor showers.

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